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The QueenTartan-clad performers, spinning oversized Tunnock's tea cakes and a giant kilt were among the highlights at a feel-good Commonwealth Games 2014 opening ceremony on Wednesday night.

The Queen officially opened the games before a 40,000-strong crowd in Glasgow's Celtic Park with millions more expected to watch on television.

Thousands of athletes from 71 nations and territories took part.

They entered the stadium after the live show, which had a cast of around 2,000.

The Queen declared the Games open by reading her own message from inside the Commonwealth baton.

TV viewing figures across the UK peaked at 9.42m with an average of 7.6m viewers watching the ceremony. That compared to a peak of 27.3m for the London 2012 Olympic opening ceremony.

Adventurer Mark Beaumont landed on the city's river Clyde in a seaplane carrying the baton to Celtic Park, having tracked its progress across the Commonwealth on a 288-day journey spanning almost 120,000 miles.

Inside the stadium, the baton was transferred between a group of volunteers who have helped children around Scotland find their potential through sport.

Sir Chris Hoy carried it on its final stage to Commonwealth Games Federation president Prince Imran of Malaysia, who struggled briefly to open the container and remove the message to hand to the Queen.


Her Majesty then spoke of the "shared ideals and ambitions" of the Commonwealth and highlighted the "bonds that unite" the 71 nations and territories.

"The baton relay represents a calling together of people from every part of the Commonwealth and serves as a reminder of our shared ideals and ambitions as a diverse, resourceful and cohesive family.

"And now, that baton has arrived here in Glasgow, a city renowned for its dynamic cultural and sporting achievements and for the warmth of its people, for this opening ceremony of the Friendly Games."

The Queen, in her role as head of the Commonwealth, then sent her best wishes to the competing athletes.

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